The teacher, 28 years old, started talking in class, dizzy

In January, while teaching in a special education class, Areti Bukas tried to say a box of words he often said. At first he thought it sounded like that, because he said it many times. But then he realized that he was being ridiculed.

When his head began to spin and his left side became paralyzed, Areti Bukas did not understand what was happening. Fortunately, his colleagues realized that he needed help and immediately called 911.Areti Bukas

“I got up and felt dizzy, and it was a very strange feeling of dizziness,” the 28-year-old Queens teacher said TODAY. “I was trying to drink water, but the water didn’t go away, and I felt weird.” When someone ran to the nurse, she started crying.

“My left side was completely paralyzed. I could not feel anything in my left half, hands, feet, and toes. My face is down, ”he said. “I remember trying to stab my left side with my right hand, but I didn’t feel anything.”

Colleagues suspected that he was having a stroke, and their operational efforts changed.

“I am very grateful to have reached (the hospital) so quickly,” he said. “I have never heard of a young man having a stroke.”

Dizziness, vertigo and paralysis

When the bull could not understand what was happening, his colleagues learned that he needed immediate medical attention because he had a stroke. When he realized he couldn’t feel his left side, he tried to get up again.

“Because my leg didn’t work, I fell, and they grabbed me, put me in a chair, and took me down three steps down the ambulance,” Bukas explained. “Our assistant director came with me and he told me everything would be fine.”

Although the bull knew about the stroke, he did not think it could be with someone like him.

“I’m young, I’m healthy, I eat right and exercise – you know what they need to do,” he said. “I didn’t think (stroke) belonged to me.”

Areti Bukas wanted to return to class this school year.  Recovery took longer than he expected, but he will return to special education by the end of the school year.
Areti Bukas wanted to return to class this school year. Recovery took longer than he expected, but he will return to special education by the end of the school year.Areti Bukas

Paramedics warned the hospital that they had “activated their stroke team.”

“I remember they bit something on the left side of my body,” he said. “I didn’t feel anything with the pen or their fingers. They lifted my legs and watched as he fell, raised his hand to my face, and went down, and I could not stop beating him. ”

Someone told him he had a stroke and he said nothing. He couldn’t believe it. Doctors gave him an anticoagulant and performed an endovascular thrombectomy to remove the blood clot.

“Stroke is a major cause of disability and is still one of the leading causes of death in the country. This scary part, “Dr. Shahram Majidi, endovascular neurosurgeon and assistant in neurosurgery, neurology and radiology at Icahn Medical School in Mount Sinai, TODAY.” The good thing – stroke – can be treated. “

Clotted drugs work when people rush to the hospital. So doctors urge you to seek medical attention the first time you see something wrong.

“It’s not something that makes you feel like you’re asleep,‘ okay, rest for a few hours and go to bed early, and I’ll be fine, ’” Majidi said. “When the classic symptoms of a stroke appear, you should call 911.”

Areti Bukas is thankful that she was not alone in the classroom when she had a stroke and that another teacher received immediate help.  She hopes that others will understand the importance of getting emergency care for a stroke.
Areti Bukas is thankful that she was not alone in the classroom when she had a stroke and that another teacher received immediate help. She hopes that others will understand the importance of getting emergency care for a stroke.Areti Bukas

According to the American Heart Association, the symptoms of a stroke are clearly visible in FAST:

  • Ф.: His face sagging
  • THE: Weakness of the arm
  • s: Speech Impairment or Speech Difficulty
  • T: Time is equal to the brain, the sooner you get to the hospital, the longer the brain is stored

“On average, 2 million brain cells die every minute during a stroke,” Majidi said. “You can tell why time is important to the brain and every minute.”

He added that traditional risk factors for stroke include:

  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • heart disease

“We need to keep in mind that 10-15% of strokes occur in patients under the age of 50,” Majidi said. “Every young patient needs to know about the symptoms of a stroke. They need to take it seriously. ”

At times, Areti Bukas complained about the slow recovery from stroke and PFO correction.  But he now understands how far he has come since he suffered a stroke in January.
At times, Areti Bukas complained about the slow recovery from stroke and PFO correction. But he now understands how far he has come since he suffered a stroke in January.Areti Bukas

Stroke in young people

In the absence of younger and more traditional risk factors for stroke patients, doctors perform tests to determine what caused it. In the bull case, he learned that he had a patented foramen ovale (PFO) that had a hole in his heart.

“When the baby is in the womb, the lungs don’t work, so there has to be a conduit for blood to flow from right to left,” he said. Sahil Hera, interventional director of the structural heart program of the Mount Sinai hospital, said today. “When babies are born, these holes or, more precisely, the tunnel holes are closed.”

However, about 25% to 30% of people do not close this hole. Most people never know and live a healthy life. But for some, PFOs can lead to stroke and need repair. If left untreated, blood clots can pass from the right side of the heart to the left, leading to a stroke.

“It’s helpful to cover patients,” Hera said. “These are good conductors for the majority of the population.”

The bull hopes that people will seek help immediately when something in their body or health seems wrong.  This created such a difference in his experience with stroke.
The bull hopes that people will seek help immediately when something in their body or health seems wrong. This created such a difference in his experience with stroke.Areti Bukas

Closing the hole with a minimally invasive procedure introduced by Bull Hera reduced his chances of getting a stroke.

“It will definitely have profound consequences for the patient, because you had the first stroke when you were young and the last thing is the second,” he explained. “When a young patient presents with a stroke, they should be assessed for cardiovascular disease. This is very important. Not for a stroke at that time. If you find that PFO is the cause, this is to prevent recurrence.

Back to class

The bull had to undergo physical and occupational therapy, and sometimes wondered how long it would take to recover.

“I remember the first time I walked around the house. I was really stubborn and I wanted to do that, maybe I shouldn’t have done that, ”he said. “I remember how I cried on the sidewalk because I missed a block?”

His therapists and doctors praised all of his accomplishments. She recently walked 15 minutes to participate in physical therapy and hopes to walk a mile straight soon. He returns to work three times and stays in class until the end of the school year.

“I’m very happy about it because I feel really positive about my results,” he said. “I wonder how grateful I am to all my doctors, nurses and everyone.”

Bukas knows that his colleagues called 911 and were happy that he was treated quickly.

“I’m really grateful,” he said. “Maybe someone can read this, alleviate their symptoms, get immediate help, and heal as quickly as I can.”

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