The swans were euthanized on the esplanade after showing signs of bird flu

Boston’s Parks and Recreation Department said two swans living on the banks of the Charles River esplanade were euthanized after showing signs of flu. The Department of Animal Care and Supervision responded to the esplanade on Monday after receiving several calls about two sick swans. Boston firefighters and Patrol Jones, an animal surveillance officer, caught the great white swans and took them to the city’s animal shelter. “Unfortunately, the birds were severely ill and showed human-like symptoms, similar to bird flu, and were euthanized humanely,” a Parks & Recreation official said in a statement. Officials said one observer from the swan family had previously had six babies. “The major trauma began Friday night,” Dr. said. Patricia Arroyo.Arroyo said the cygnet death appeared to be a tragic accident and the rest of the swan family seemed healthy and active over the weekend. But something changed dramatically on Monday. “He called me on Monday morning and we went out and my mom was really in pain,” Arroyo said. When it rained, the mother swan struggled to lift her head. “Then we saw the other five chicks swim back to the nest alone. Then we saw that the father’s condition was worse than the mother’s,” Arroyo said. Five kignets were captured and taken to the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstyle, which will test the birds for bird flu and help them rehabilitate. A severe strain of bird flu has spread around the world, killing hundreds of birds on Martha Vineyard Island in Massachusetts in recent weeks. Although Boston officials say the euthanasia swans have symptoms of bird flu, some are wondering if there are any blue-green algae. The intense heat on Sunday could have caused the poisonous cyanobacteria to bloom – which was to blame. The swans’ deaths came almost 13 months after the mother swan, who was nesting on the banks of the Charles River in Esplanada, died suddenly. The Boston Department of Animal Control later said it could not provide further information on the death of the swan carcass. “It’s unfortunate that something that brought us this joy is turning into heart disease again,” said Manuela Gambrin-Escobar. Those in trouble are advised to keep the distance, but take a photo or video and send it to the Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. The accident could be linked to bird flu, and officials say it is important to monitor the spread of the virus. Boston officials did not say Monday whether the two euthanized swans could be slaughtered to determine if they were officially ill. died of bird flu.

Boston’s Parks and Recreation Department said two swans living on the banks of the Charles River in Esplanada were euthanized after showing signs of bird flu.

On Monday, the Department of Animal Care and Control responded to the esplanade after several calls about two sick swans.

With the help of Boston firefighters, Patty Jones, an animal surveillance officer, caught the adult swans and took them to the city’s animal service facility.

“Unfortunately, the birds became seriously ill, showed flu-like symptoms and were euthanized in a humane manner,” a park and recreation center official said in a statement.

Officials say the two swans have five teeth, while an observer from the swan family said they previously had six.

“The major trauma began on Friday night, when one of the six baby squirrels actually died near the nest,” the doctor said. Patricia Arroyo.

Arroyo said Kignet’s death was a tragic accident, and the rest of the Swans’ family seemed healthy and active over the weekend. But something changed dramatically on Monday.

“He called me on Monday morning and we went out and my mom was really upset,” Arroyo said.

Other Arroyo and Esplanade swan observers called in wildlife experts and watched as the mother swan struggled to lift its head, shedding tears and pouring rain.

Dr. Patricia Arroyo

This female swan was unable to lift her head on June 27, 2022, while walking on the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. City officials said the swan was euthanized by a male swan with a kignet nest on the Charles River esplanade. showed symptoms consistent with avian influenza.

“Then we saw the other five chicks come to the nest alone. Then we saw their father in a worse condition than their mother,” Arroyo said.

These white swan cygnets were orphaned along the Charles River after their parents.  The birds had to be euthanized after showing consistent symptoms of influenza.

An award

The parents of these white swans were orphaned in Esplanade on the Charles River because they had to be euthanized after showing flu-like symptoms.

Five kygnets were captured and taken to the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstyle, where they will be tested for bird flu and help rehabilitate them.

A severe strain of bird flu has spread around the world, killing hundreds of birds on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts in recent weeks.

Although Boston authorities say euthanized swans have symptoms of bird flu, some have questioned whether the blue-green algae may have caused it, as Sunday’s intense heat could have caused the poisonous cyanobacteria to flourish.

The swans’ deaths came almost 13 months after the mother swan, who was nesting on the banks of the Charles River in Esplanada, died suddenly. The Boston Department of Animal Control later said it could not provide further details about the swan’s death.

“It’s unfortunate that something that brings us this joy is turning into heart disease again,” said Manuela Gambrin-Escobar.

People who have encountered a bird in distress are advised to keep their distance, but take a photo or video and send it to the Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. The accident could be linked to bird flu, and officials say it is important to control the spread of the virus.

Boston authorities have not said they will officially bury two euthanized swans on Monday to determine they died of influenza.

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