The national stockpile of drugs to fight monkeys is a concern

As the rare monkey smallpox virus continues to spread in the United States and has now been detected 40 times in 15 states and the District of Columbia, some are concerned about the national stockpile of drugs to fight the infection.

While White House officials say the country has ample access to vaccines and medicine to fight the impending uprising, official figures have not been released, making it difficult for Americans to determine how easy it will be to access resources in the event of a large-scale epidemic. occurs.

The United States has already registered about 40 cases of the virus, but experts warn that the lack of surveillance and testing is about nine times higher than the true figure. Some fear that the virus will become endemic in the United States and parts of Europe, as it does in parts of Central and West Africa.

No deaths have been reported as part of the current global monkey smallpox epidemic, including 1,200 cases in 29 countries where the virus is not endemic.

The White House could not say how many doses of the vaccine were available to fight the monkey disease.

Bavarian Nordic’s jab, Jynneos, is the best option to fight the virus. To prevent infection, it should be given to someone after being shot.

There have been 300 reported cases of monkey disease in the United States, almost ten times the official figure, the expert said.

There may be as many as 300 cases of smallpox in the United States, which is nine times more than 31, but missed hundreds of cases due to a lack of testing, an expert warned Monday.

Dr. Boguma Titanji, an infectious disease expert at Emory University in Georgia, confirmed that the United States has the same infections as the United Kingdom – the world’s largest monkeypox outbreak.

However, he said the difficult process of inspecting tampons – which had to be sent to one of the 74 local laboratories and then to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmation – was poorly done and many were missed.

Other experts say that infections may go undetected because the disease is mild and self-limiting, leading to patient absenteeism or misdiagnosis as a sexually transmitted disease such as syphilis.

Titanji told STAT News: “There are a lot of cases in the U.S. like Canada or the UK.

“We haven’t been tested enough to be able to say for sure that there are only 25 cases. I think we need to try much more than we do.

This is the only shot approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to fight monkey pox. It was originally designed to fight smallpox – a disease that has now been eradicated, coming from a family of viruses such as monkeys.

At a briefing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) last week, officials declined to say how many shots the vaccine had. STAT News reports that the federal government has taken or plans to take 72,000 doses together.

Jynneos is a two-dose vaccine, enough to immunize 36,000 Americans.

STAT said the Norwegian ammunition manufacturer still has one million doses on deck for the U.S. and could meet another 16 million shooting offers.

That would be almost enough, as it would only be enough for 8.5 million of the more than 330 million Americans.

The latest weed, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), a leading CDC vaccine expert, has made recommendations for prioritizing orthopoxvirus laboratory workers, those working in laboratory testing, and health care providers treating infected patients. .

The ACAM2000 is another available jab.

ACAM2000 is an old vaccine like JYNNEOS that was developed to prevent smallpox and was effective only after exposure to the virus. The United States is reportedly stockpiling more than 100 million doses, a figure that could vary across the CDC.

It is also a concern for all vaccines against smallpox, as the risk of adverse events associated with it is high.

After infection, there are no special antivirals adapted for smallpox, and instead doctors work with smallpox drugs.

The federal government has declined to say how many stocks of smallpox drugs are available.

Although Americans do not see this as an urgent need, an expert warns that even though more than a million people are infected, the virus is spreading faster than surveillance.

Dr. Boguma Titanji, an infectious disease expert at Emory University in Georgia, told STAT that the United States has the same infections as the United Kingdom, which is home to the world’s largest monkey population.

However, he said the complicated process of testing tampons – which must be sent to one of the 74 local laboratories and then sent to the CDC for confirmation – has done very little and missed many.

Other experts say that infections may go undetected because the disease is mild and self-limiting, leading to patient absenteeism or misdiagnosis as a sexually transmitted disease such as syphilis.

Five new works were added to the American Book on Thursday. Everything is already registered in the states or cities.

Due to confidentiality reasons, the identities of those infected remain unknown, despite the fact that the first patient was identified in the UK.

Yesterday MailOnline identified the first patient of the current monkey smallpox – his name is James M.

Like many other patients with monkey smallpox, James is gay. Health officials around the world have warned that the virus is spreading through sexual networks, and last month’s sexual raids in Belgium and Spain were linked to the spread of the virus to Europe.

James M, 35 (pictured), the first British monkey to become ill with smallpox

James M, 35 (pictured), the first British monkey to become ill with smallpox

The London-based HR manager said he had a positive assessment of the virus after being deported from Dubai for testing positive for HIV.

He criticized British health officials for “the lack of a real process or care” for the tropical virus, which has infected more than 300 Britons, mostly gay and bisexual men.

James, who did not want to be named, admitted that he was not following the rules of self-isolation because “I was told to stay home until the UKHSA contacted me … and they never did.”

He accused the UK of being misguided in its search for connections, saying it was not surprising that Britain had more cases than any other country outside of Africa. There is also a lack of information about the lesser-known symptoms of smallpox in monkeys, he said.

While James was getting used to living in west London, his back began to ache “really weirdly” when he was tired, very thirsty and sick when he went to the bathroom.

She was diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) while sleeping with about 10 new partners for several weeks before the onset of symptoms.

“I’m gay, and when I first came to the UK, I had a good time,” he told MailOnline.

However, doctors mistakenly thought that this was not a monkey disease because they did not have the virus.

James had just returned from Dubai, where it was illegal to be gay, four years after he was diagnosed with “shock” in February. This saw him lose his job and his home.

After contacting a local STI clinic in west London, James was sent for a check-up at a special center in Soho on May 25 and was told not to use public transport or close contact with others.

Because he admitted that he was not following the rules of self-isolation

When James was getting used to living in west London

He admitted that he was not following the rules of self-isolation because “I was told to stay home until UKHSA contacted me … and they never did”

This was after the CDC yesterday refused to advise Americans to wear masks when traveling to countries where cases of monkey disease have been reported.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) removed the directive from its website last night – 13 hours after media reports.

A spokesman for the agency told DailyMail.com today that it had been removed for fear of “creating chaos”.

They stressed that the veil-wearing council was “for travelers” and not for the general public, adding that all future updates would be accompanied by a public announcement.

Six days ago, the CDC quietly added a warning to wear a cover to a Level 2 travel warning – urging “increased precautionary measures” abroad. It was picked up by Fox News on Monday night, along with CNBC and other websites along with this website.

The expert said today that it was “regrettable” that the CDC had given and removed this advice, as it could further damage public confidence in the agency.

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