Researchers have called for a ban on the term “sick” obesity because it is an insult.

Scientists call obese people who wake up today a “sick” category of obesity.

And they urged doctors and scientists to stop calling unsuccessful weight loss efforts “successes.”

The terms used to move forward should include “ineffective” or “insufficient” weight loss, or even “secondary weight loss”.

No specific recommendations have been made for the replacement of the phrase “sick”, but it is strictly used instead.

Critics criticized the proposal, published today in a leading obesity magazine, saying it was “interesting” because patient obesity is a clinical term.

But industry experts agree that “less stigmatizing” language is crucial in the fight against size, and say “words are really important.”

Joe Nadglovsky, president of the Coalition to Combat Obesity, said, “Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words never hurt me.”

This comes after a separate team of investigators argued that the word obesity should be removed in favor of racism and “big-bodied people”.

It is unfortunate to shoot the “sick” obese people in the fattest category and say that their weight loss efforts have “failed”.

More than 42 million adults in the UK will be overweight or obese by 2040, according to a new UK forecast by Cancer Research in the UK.

More than 42 million adults in the UK will be overweight or obese by 2040, according to a new UK forecast by Cancer Research in the UK.

The proposed change to the language of obesity was published in the journal Obesity by a group of British experts, who described themselves as “the main source of information for obese people …”.

Researchers analyzed the articles of 3,000 academics on bariatric surgery, including gastric bypass and bypass surgery.

They wanted to see “how much terminology is used.”

2.4 percent of screened papers had the word “no” and 16.8 percent had the word “sick.”

The 16 patients who tried to lose weight were also interviewed by telephone about how their tongues made them feel.

HOW TO CALCULATE BODY MASS INDEX – AND WHAT?

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on your weight.

Standard formula:

  • BMI = (weight in pounds / (height in inches x height in inches)) x 703

Metric formula:

  • BMI = (weight in kilograms / (height in meters x height in meters))

Dimensions:

  • Under 18 years of age: low weight
  • 18.5 – 24.9: healthy
  • 25 – 29.9: overweight
  • 30 – 39.9: obesity
  • 40+: Obesity

Some said they shed tears and avoided seeking medical attention for 20 years.

They emphasized how the word “failure” meant personal responsibility for weight loss, citing lack of willpower or lack of self-control.

At the same time, the team claimed that “sick” means “not healthy”. One of the participants called it a “downloadable” phrase.

Richard Wellburn, a bariatric surgeon at Somerset’s Masgrow Park Hospital, said: “All health professionals should be aware of this study and consider the use of language when talking to colleagues and patients about obesity.

‘Non-judgmental, standardized terminology helps patients feel safe talking about weight and potential treatments.’

Mr. Nadglovsky, who did not participate in the study, said: “Our words are really important.

“Poor or outdated language can damage a provider’s relationship with a provider and ultimately prevent obese people from seeking or receiving help.

“The time has come for us to prioritize better language around obesity.”

Christopher Snowdon of the Institute for Economic Research says: “Obesity is a clinical term, so it’s strange to tell clinicians and academics not to use it.

“This disease is called obesity because if the BMI is above 35, the risk of death is higher than being overweight and obese.

An analysis by the British company Cancer Research shows that by 2040, 71% of people are likely to be overweight or obese.  Of these, almost 36 percent (21 million) of adults are likely to be obese (blue dotted line).  Graph: Estimates of the proportion of healthy (gray), overweight (pink) and obese (blue) people in the UK from 2010 to 2040

An analysis by the British company Cancer Research shows that by 2040, 71% of people are likely to be overweight or obese. Of these, almost 36 percent (21 million) of adults are likely to be obese (blue dotted line). Graph: Estimates of the proportion of healthy (gray), overweight (pink) and obese (blue) people in the UK from 2010 to 2040

Graph: Forecasts for the proportion of obese men (pink) and women (pink) in the UK from 2010 to 2040.

Graph: Forecasts for the proportion of obese men (pink) and women (pink) in the UK from 2010 to 2040.

Graph: Forecasts for the proportion of overweight men (pink) and women (pink) in the UK from 2010 to 2040.

Graph: Forecasts for the proportion of overweight men (pink) and women (pink) in the UK from 2010 to 2040.

“An organization called the Obesity Society writes in a magazine called Obesity that people think they suffer more than they are characterized by being obese, but it’s not clear why they’re happy to be called obese.

“Maybe we should go back to saying people are fat?”

The NHS Obesity Advice Sheets do not say “sick” or “sick,” but instead say BMI above 40 is “severe obesity.”

However, the term is still used in some parts of the health care website.

The team, which wrote in the new newspaper, said the “conscious effort” to change the language was “best done gradually”.

The UK and the US are currently battling an obesity crisis, with nearly two-thirds of adults overweight.

Experts warn that if the IUD trend is not reversed, smoking, the biggest cause of obesity, will be eliminated.

To combat the epidemic, earlier this year №10 introduced mandatory caloric labeling for restaurants, cafes and food outlets in the UK with more than 250 employees.

However, the government has also postponed a ban on “buy someone” proposals for unhealthy food due to the high cost of living.

WHAT SHOULD A BALANCED DIET BE?

According to the NHS, foods such as potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates should ideally be whole grains

According to the NHS, foods such as potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates should ideally be whole grains

• Eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. All fresh, frozen, dried and canned fruits and vegetables are taken into account

• The main food is potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, preferably whole grains.

• 30 grams of fiber per day: This is equivalent to eating all of the following: 5 servings of fruit, 2 whole grain biscuits, 2 large slices of bread and a large potato with peel

• Choose low-fat and low-sugar types and have milk or dairy alternatives (such as soy drinks).

• Eat small amounts of beans, peas, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 servings of fish per week, one of which should be fatty)

• Choose unsaturated fats and spreads and use small amounts

• Drink 6-8 glasses / glass of water per day

• Adults should have 6 g of salt per day and 20 g of saturated fat for women and 30 g for men.

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide

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