If you are poor, cancer will return twice as often, and research shows that it can cause fear

Research shows that if you are poor, cancer will double again … the cost of living raises concerns that the crisis will hamper patients’ chances of survival.

  • Two years after the cancer, a third of those earning less than £ 19,000 returned
  • “The cost of living has an immediate effect on cancer patients,” he said.
  • Sajid Javid said: “Providing the world’s leading cancer care is a key priority”
  • Proper nutrition and living in a healthy environment play an important role

Studies show that cancer patients from poor families are twice as likely to return.

Experts say the cost of a life crisis could worsen the lives of thousands of cancer patients, making it harder for caregivers to pay for healthy meals or energy bills.

The University of Toronto’s study involved 555 people with head and neck cancer.

Two years after treatment, cancer returned to a third of patients from households earning less than £ 19,000, compared to 12 per cent for those over £ 56,000. When the results were adjusted, the recurrence rate was twice as high in poor patients.

According to the study’s author, Dr. Christopher Noel, wealth inequality “not only impairs their quality of life, but in fact affects their lives.”

Proper nutrition and a healthy and comfortable environment play an important role in your body’s ability to treat cancer.

Dr David Pinato of Imperial College London said: “I think the cost of living crisis in the UK will have an immediate impact on cancer patients.”

Health Minister Sajid Javid said the government was “making progress in ensuring well-being.” [cancer] results’.

The results were announced at a conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

According to Dr. Noel, the analysis provided more information than previous studies looking at postal codes, rather than household income.

He said: “We asked them personal questions about how much money they earned each year and asked them to keep track of their expenses.

“He emphasized to us that those earning less than $ 30,000 (£ 19,000) in particular suffer proportionally.”

According to Dr. Noel, low-income patients may be less likely to follow a treatment plan or complete a course of radiotherapy, which increases their risk of recurrent cancer.

Later presentations, basic health conditions, and the poor quality of medical care available may also play a role.

Treatment for cervical cancer may be particularly intensive, but Dr. Noel says the same trend is expected for other cancers.

He also said that although there are some differences, Canada’s health care system is very similar to the NHS and equivalent research should be conducted in the UK.

Two years after treatment, one-third of household patients earning less than £ 19,000 have recovered from cancer.

Two years after treatment, one-third of household patients earning less than £ 19,000 have recovered from cancer.

Dr. Pinato added, “Families can’t do things like pay out of pocket for extra support like guardians.

Even proper nutrition and electricity bills are affected.

“Proper nutrition and living in a healthy and comfortable environment play a big role in ensuring that your body has enough to treat cancer.

“If these pillars are removed, we will no longer be able to offer treatment to patients or I am worried that their results will be poor.”

Sajid Javid, Secretary of Health and Social Welfare, said: “I have made it clear that addressing health disparities across the country and providing the world’s leading cancer care is a top priority for this government.

“We are already making progress in providing better results for cancer patients – this week we announced that we have delivered one million tests, scans and recouped billions of pounds through our 90 community diagnostic centers.

“But we know there is more work to be done.”

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