HPV vaccination can prevent cancer in women with precancerous cells on their cervix, research suggests

HPV vaccination can prevent cancer in women with precancerous cells on their cervix, research suggests

  • The team studied data from women who had previously had their cancerous cells removed
  • Those who received HPV coverage were 60% less likely to have the worrisome cells reoccur
  • Also, the risk of HPV infection in most cervical cancers is reduced by three-quarters

Giving the HPV vaccine to women with cervical cancer can reduce their risk of developing cervical cancer, researchers say.

Experts from Imperial College London reviewed studies involving thousands of women who received the HPV vaccine, which is supposed to remove precancerous cells.

The findings, published in the British Medical Journal, show that those who received additional HPV coverage along with treatment were 60 percent less likely to have the troublesome cells reoccur.

The researchers noted that their findings need to be confirmed by larger studies, but they believe the results are “robust”.

Researchers at Imperial College London reviewed studies involving thousands of women who received the HPV vaccine, which is supposed to remove precancerous cells. The results, published in the British Medical Journal, show that those who received an additional HPV vaccine along with treatment were 60 percent less likely to have the troublesome cells reoccur.

WHAT IS HPV? INFECTION IS LINKED TO 99 PERCENT OF CERVICAL CANCER

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the name given to a group of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that cover your body.

It is spread through skin-to-skin contact between the navel, anal, and oral sex, and between the genitals, which is very common.

Up to eight out of 10 people will be infected with this virus at some point in their lives.

There are more than 100 types of HPV. About 30 of them can affect the genitals. Genital HPV infections are common and highly contagious.

Many people never show symptoms because they can develop years after infection and in most cases go away without treatment.

It can cause genital warts and is known to cause abnormal tissue growth and cervical cancer.

Each year, on average, 38,000 cases of HPV-related cancer are diagnosed in the US, 3,100 cases of cervical cancer in the UK, and about 2,000 other cancers in men.

What other cancers cause?

  • Throat
  • neck
  • The language
  • tonsils
  • Vulva
  • Vagina
  • Penis
  • Anus

In the UK, the human papillomavirus (HPV) cover is recommended for girls and boys aged 12 to 13, while in the US it is recommended for boys from the age of nine.

It helps prevent cancer caused by the virus, such as cervical, anal, and some head and neck cancers.

The vaccine was introduced in 2008 and until now people aged 13 and over are not routinely recommended for vaccination under the NHS programme.

But a recent study suggests that women with precancerous cells in their cervix – scientifically known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) – may benefit from taking it.

CIN caused by HPV is not cancerous, but can develop into cervical cancer if left untreated.

Cervical smear tests detect abnormal cells. Follow-up tests are needed to confirm whether or not CIN is present.

Surgery may be required to remove them.

Once a woman is diagnosed with high-grade precancerous cells on her cervix, her risk of developing cervical cancer is lifelong.

Previous studies have shown that giving a preventive HPV vaccine along with surgery to remove abnormal CIN cells can help reduce women’s risk.

To investigate this further, experts analyzed the results of 18 studies to assess whether HPV coverage reduced the risk of recurrence of abnormal cells after surgery.

The studies followed the women for an average of three years.

The results showed that the risk of recurrence of “high-grade preinvasive disease” was 57 percent lower among those who received the vaccine along with surgery compared to those who were not vaccinated.

The findings were even stronger among women carrying strains of the virus most commonly associated with cervical cancer.

However, the researchers noted that the vaccine’s effects are unclear because data are limited and the studies were moderate-to-high risk.

And there was insufficient evidence to determine whether HPV coverage reduced the risk of vulvar, vaginal, or anal lesions and genital warts.

In addition, most studies did not record the mean age of participants and did not control for risk factors such as smoking.

However, the team said together they had strict inclusion criteria and assessed the quality and bias of the study, suggesting the findings were robust.

However, they noted that high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the effectiveness and cost of HPV vaccination.

Advertising

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.