Eating like Popeye will protect you from dementia!

Like pope, eating spinach doesn’t just make you stronger – it can protect against dementia, the study said.

Researchers have found that people with high levels of the three main antioxidants in their blood are less likely to suffer from memory loss.

Two compounds – lutein and zeaxanthin – are found in leafy greens and beans.

Oranges and papaya are other major sources of beta-cryptoxanthin.

Dr. Mae Baidun, a senior researcher at the National Institutes of Health, said: “Enhancing people’s cognitive function is an important part of public health.

“Antioxidants help protect the brain from oxidative stress, which can lead to cell damage.”

But he added that more research is needed to see if antioxidants can really “help protect the brain from dementia.”

Researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health found that each increase in lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxantine levels reduced the risk of dementia. Lutein and zeaxanthin are found in green, leafy vegetables such as cabbage, spinach, broccoli and beans.

Eating spinach, like Popey (pictured), doesn't just make you stronger - it protects you from mental disorders.  In other words, if new research is to be believed.  Researchers have found that people with high levels of the three antioxidants in their blood are less likely to suffer from memory impairment.

Eating spinach, like Popey (pictured), doesn’t just make you stronger – it protects you from mental disorders. In other words, if new research is to be believed. Researchers have found that people with high levels of the three antioxidants in their blood are less likely to suffer from memory impairment.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, did not consider the diet of volunteers.

However, scientists have long argued that proper nutrition can help prevent dementia by improving the health of the heart and circulatory system.

Just through diet, people can raise blood levels of the three compounds by taking supplements.

Dr. Baidu and his colleagues analyzed blood samples from more than 7,000 Americans.

All participants were at least 45 years old and so on physical exam and interview at the beginning of the study.

They were then monitored for an average of 16 years, so experts were able to monitor the level of mental impairment.

Participants were divided into three groups according to their levels of lutein and antioxidants zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin in the blood.

WHAT DOES DIETY HAVE TO DO WITH DIET?

Dozens of studies have shown that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help reduce the risk of dementia.

Experts say that following a specific diet can affect the biological mechanisms that lead to mental disorders.

Eating increases the risk of diabetes, obesity and heart disease, which are indirectly associated with dementia.

Studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables, fruits, vegetables and fish lowers blood pressure and poses a risk of mental retardation.

The researchers found that each increase in lutein and zeaxanthin levels of 15.4 micromol per liter was associated with a seven percent reduction in the risk of mental disorders.

At the same time, an increase of 8.6 micromoles per liter of beta-cryptoxanthin reduced the risk of developing dementia by 14 percent.

Other factors, including education, income, and physical activity, reduced the effects of antioxidants on dementia.

“Perhaps these factors can help explain the link between antioxidant levels and dementia,” added Dr. Baidun.

The team also acknowledged that the results were limited because they “may not reflect people’s lifetime levels”.

Dozens of studies have shown that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help reduce the risk of mental disorders that afflict 944,000 Britons and 6.5 million Americans.

Experts say that following a specific diet can affect the biological mechanisms that lead to mental disorders.

Eating increases the risk of diabetes, obesity and heart disease, which are indirectly associated with dementia.

Studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables, fruits, vegetables and fish lowers blood pressure and poses a risk of mental retardation.

James Connell, a doctor with Alzheimer’s research in the UK, said previous findings on the link between antioxidants and the risk of mental illness were “mixed”.

Taking into account lifestyle, socioeconomic status and physical activity factors, the risk reduction seen in the new study was “reduced,” he said.

“It is important that researchers continue to study the protective effects of antioxidants in the context of other risk factors and work to understand their interactions,” said Dr. Connell.

He said: “Diseases that cause dementia develop over many years, but this study looked at antioxidant levels only once.

“While this study highlights a potentially interesting discovery, it is important that the study take a long-term view of the factors that may affect risk.”

Dr. Connell added: “The only way to know if any food or dietary supplements containing them can help reduce the risk of dementia is through careful clinical trials in the future.

“We know that the risk of mental disorders is complex and there are lifestyle factors such as age and genetic factors as well as nutrition.

“Lifestyle adjustments reduce the risk of developing diseases that lead to mental disorders.”

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.