Children were infected with three viruses at the same time because COVID measures weakened the immune system.

Children are infected with three different strains of the virus in medical clinics, which experts say is the result of two years of weakened immune systems due to COVID blockade and wearing a mask.

Health workers expect an increase in the number of cases of colds and flu during the winter.

But they say there is no normal decline as summer approaches – and they suspect this may be due to severe pandemic practices.

In addition, some common strains of influenza seem to have disappeared, drawing the attention of scientists.

Thomas Murray, an infection control expert and associate professor of pediatrics at Yale University, told The Washington Post on Monday that his team was seeing children with a combination of seven common viruses – adenovirus, rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, and influenza. and parainfluenza, as well as coronavirus.

According to him, some children were infected with two and some with three viruses.

“It’s not specific to any time of year and it’s not specific to May and June,” he said.

Data from the CDC, obtained by DailyMail.com, have reduced the overall rate of influenza infections among young children – but the abnormal phenomenon occurs a few weeks earlier in the early summer months, usually the deadliest period for respiratory infections.

The flu virus usually disappears during the warmer months (see red line, 2019). In 2019, the peak of infection occurred in the 10th week of the year, in March. But this year (blue line) it remained stable and did not surprise scientists.

Children aged 0-4 years are experiencing an increase in viral infections, which experts say is due to the fact that they are not exposed to the normal viral load – due to pandemic measures.

Other strange patterns have emerged.

The rhinovirus, commonly known as the common cold, is not usually severe enough to send people to the hospital, but now it is.

Michael Mina, epidemiologist and senior researcher at the Digital Health Platform, eMed

Michael Mina, an epidemiologist and senior researcher at the Digital Health Platform, described eMed’s current situation as a “mass natural experiment”.

RSV is usually reduced in warm weather like the flu, but not in them.

And the flu in Yamagata has not been seen since the beginning of 2020 – it could be because researchers say it’s gone, or it’s just waiting for the right moment to fall asleep and come back.

“It’s a massive natural experiment,” said Michael Mina, an epidemiologist and senior researcher at the eMed digital health platform, Postka.

Mina adds that what time of year Americans detect infections may be because the population has not been exposed to the virus for some time – making them vulnerable when they return.

“The more people who don’t have immunity, the less time it has. It’s like free government,” he said.

Thus, the virus can “overcome seasonal barriers”.

Peter Hotes, a molecular virologist and dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, agreed that the norms would change and that seasonal models would no longer be used.

“What time of year is it?” – you think. ‘ he said.

The RSV virus is visible under a powerful microscope.  The virus is most commonly detected in children during the winter

The RSV virus is visible under a powerful microscope. The virus is most commonly detected in children during the winter

This computer-simulated model, developed by researchers at Purdue University, shows that the receptors for a cold virus attach to the outer protein shell of the rhinovirus 16 virus.

This computer-simulated model, developed by researchers at Purdue University, shows that the receptors for a cold virus attach to the outer protein shell of the rhinovirus 16 virus.

The shifts are also forcing hospitals to reconsider their approach to RSV – a common virus that infects about 60,000 children under the age of five each year. This can lead to a fatal lung infection, especially in vulnerable young people.

Treatment is with monthly doses of monoclonal antibodies, which are usually available only from November to February.

Concerned scientists are now closely monitoring the virus if they suddenly need medication.

Ellen Foxman, an immunobiologist at Yale School of Medicine, said that her study of why viruses can make one person seriously ill and relatively harmless to another would be of great interest to scientists.

“Those children did not have an infection at a critical time in their lung development,” he said.

Foxman added that over the past few years, the general population, as well as scientists, have learned a lot about how to prevent viruses and infections.

“We need to move some of the lessons we’ve learned forward,” he said.

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