Bird flu has been reported in two herds in Berks County

Avian influenza continues to spread in southern Pennsylvania. For the first time in Burke County, there are positive animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said two flocks were on commercial duck farms. One was a duck keeper, and the other was raising ducks for meat. Another 29,500 birds were destroyed. New control zone New positive indicators mean that there is now a new control zone. The initial control zone was established in mid-April after the herd. Passed a positive test in the town of East Donegal, Lancaster County. The control zone has expanded as bird flu has spread to other herds in nearby areas. Berks County now has a new control zone. The control zone is located approximately six miles from each of the affected farms. Farms in the control zone should intensify cleaning and disinfection methods, as well as increase virus testing before transplanting any products. The Pennsylvania Avian Influenza has so far affected nine herds in Pennsylvania and killed nearly 3.9 million birds. Most of the positives were in Berks and Lancaster counties. Report Avian Influenza If you suspect a live bird is infected, please contact the Pennsylvania Animal Health Bureau and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852. This number is 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Symptoms of avian influenza in birds include a lack of energy and a lack of appetite. Risk of Avian Influenza There is no risk to the community and birds and eggs can be eaten if cooked properly. However, highly pathogenic avian influenza is highly contagious and can be fatal for domestic birds (chickens, ducks, geese, quails, pheasants, guinea fowl, and turkeys). an immediate public health issue.

Avian flu continues in southern Pennsylvania.

For the first time in Burke County, there are positive sheep.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said two herds are on commercial duck farms. One raised ducks and the other raised ducks for meat.

Another 29,500 birds were killed.

new control area

The new positives mean that there is now a new governing zone.

The initial control zone was established in mid-April in the town of East Donegal, Lancaster County, after a positive test of the herd.

The outbreak has been expanded as avian influenza has spread to other herds in nearby areas.

A new surveillance zone has now emerged in Burke County.

The control zone is approximately six miles from each of the affected farms.

Farms in the control zone should improve cleaning and disinfection methods, and increase virus testing before transplanting any products.

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Avian Influenza in Pennsylvania

So far, nine herds in Pennsylvania have been affected and nearly 3.9 million birds have been killed.

All the positives were in Berks and Lancaster counties.

Report avian influenza

If you suspect live birds are infected, you should contact the Pennsylvania Animal Health and Diagnostic Service at 717-772-2852. This number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Symptoms of avian influenza in birds include lack of energy and appetite.

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Risk of avian influenza

There is no danger to the community, and birds and eggs can be cooked and eaten properly.

However, highly pathogenic avian influenza is highly contagious and can be fatal to poultry (chickens, ducks, geese, quails, pheasants, seabirds, and turkeys).

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, bird flu detection does not pose an immediate threat to public health.

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