All appointments for the monkeypox vaccine clinic in Baltimore are filled

Dozens of monkeypox vaccines are being administered in Baltimore over the next two days. Officials from the Baltimore City Health Department and Chase Braxton held a press conference Tuesday morning. Maryland had 87 suspected and confirmed cases as of Monday. For disease control and prevention. Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa said 21 cases have been reported in the Baltimore metro area. “The general public needs to be aware that monkeypox exists in Baltimore and they need to understand the symptoms and ways the virus spreads,” Dzirasa said.| LINK: Baltimore City Health Department Monkey Dzirasa Chase Braxton said the monkey began the first day of a two-day vaccination clinic with 60 doses of the smallpox vaccine. All appointments for the vaccine have been filled and no one is being accepted. So far, the CDC has been slow to distribute vaccines. Maryland received 3,300 shots from a national stockpile, according to the Baltimore City Health Department. Of that, the city received 200 vaccine doses and officials said more will be delivered to Baltimore, Dzirasa said. “Everyone in the health care space in Maryland — providers, community advocates, elected officials and state and local health departments — is calling for more doses for our residents.” Dzirasa said the health department is distributing its current doses as follows: 75 doses, 60 doses for contact tracing efforts and BCHD clinics and services. “We are actively working to distribute these doses equitably, so they are here for people who are at high risk of contracting and spreading monkeypox. Baltimore,” said Dzirasa. | LINK: Maryland Department of Health Monkey Pox Information “We will continue to assess where we are and what additional resources and support are needed, and we will work with city leaders to get what we need. proactive response,” said Dzirasa. The Department of Health is also trying to reach out to the LGBTQIA+ community, which has been disproportionately affected by the virus.” As soon as possible,” said Renee Lau, senior housing manager for Safe Haven Baltimore, an organization that helps at-risk members of the LGBTQIA+ community. “Why would this target the LBGT community is probably more concerning for an organization like us, and we’re going to inform the general public. “Baltimore Safe Haven is working side-by-side with the city to organize a mobile outreach program. The money was sent to the public in hopes of stopping the spread of smallpox. “It’s important to get this information out because we don’t need another outbreak, especially in the LGBT community,” Lau said. The head of the World Health Organization declared an “emergency” on Saturday after the outbreak of monkeypox in more than 70 countries, which is now a global emergency. Spread by personal or skin-to-skin contact, including measles cuts, sores, body fluids, or scabs include hugging, kissing, touching, or intimate or sexual contact. the connection. It can also be spread by contact with clothing, bedding, sheets, and towels contaminated with fluids or wounds. Symptoms of monkeypox usually begin one to two weeks after illness, but can last from five to 21 days, and include fever, chills, body/muscle/headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and fatigue. Anyone with questions can call the Baltimore City Health Department’s Public Health and Disease Prevention Division at 410-396-4436.11 TV Hill Video: What is Monkey Pox? How does it spread?

Dozens of monkeypox vaccines are being made in Baltimore over the next two days.

Baltimore City Health Department officials and Chase Braxton held a news conference Tuesday morning about the monkeypox.

Maryland had 87 suspected and confirmed cases as of Monday, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa said 21 cases have been reported in the Baltimore metro area.

“The general public needs to be aware that monkeypox is in Baltimore, and they need to understand the symptoms and common methods of transmission of the virus,” Dzirasa said.

| LINK: Baltimore City Health Department Monkey Pox Information

Dzirasa Chase Braxton said she started the first day of the two-day vaccination clinic with 60 doses of the monkeypox vaccine. All vaccine appointments are filled and no walk-ins will be accepted.

So far, the CDC has been slow to roll out vaccines. Maryland received 3,300 shots from a national stockpile, according to the Baltimore City Health Department. Of that, the city has received 200 vaccine doses, and officials are working to get more to Baltimore, Dzirasa said.

“We are doing our best to provide as many doses as possible and expect to receive more doses in future phases of distribution,” Dzirasa said. “Everyone in the health care space in Maryland — providers, community advocates, elected officials and state and local health departments — is advocating for more doses for our residents.”

Dzirasa said the health department is dividing its current doses as follows: 75 doses for Chase Brexton health care, 60 doses for contact tracing efforts and 65 doses for BCHD clinics and services.

“We are actively working to distribute these doses equitably for people in Baltimore who are at high risk for monkeypox,” Dzirasa said.

| LINK: Maryland Department of Health Monkey Pox Information

Dzirasa said officials are working on awareness, education and prevention.

“We will continue to assess where we are and what additional resources and support are needed and work with city leaders to get what we need to proactively respond,” Dzirasa said.

The Department of Health is also making efforts to reach out to the LGBTQIA+ community, which has been disproportionately affected by the virus.

“The biggest concern is why. The second is being able to address it as quickly as possible,” said Renee Lau, senior housing manager at Baltimore Safe Haven, an organization that helps at-risk members of the LGBTQIA+ community. “Why is this targeting the LBGT community, maybe an organization like us should be more concerned and let the general public know.”

Baltimore Safe Haven is working side-by-side with the city to organize a mobile outreach program to educate the public about chicken pox, all in hopes of stopping the spread.

“Getting this information is critical because we don’t need another epidemic, especially in the LGBT community,” Lau said.

The head of the World Health Organization on Saturday declared the outbreak of monkeypox in more than 70 countries an “extraordinary” situation, now being classified as a global emergency.

| LINK: CDC Monkey Pox Information

According to the health department, the virus is spread through close, personal or skin-to-skin contact with someone who has monkeypox, including hugging, kissing, touching, or having intimate or sexual contact with rashes, sores, body fluids or scabies. It can also be spread through contact with clothing, bedding, sheets, liquids, or towels contaminated with sores.

Symptoms of monkeypox usually begin one to two weeks after illness, but can range from five to 21 days, and include fever, chills, body/muscle/headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and fatigue.

Anyone with questions can call the Baltimore City Health Department’s Public Health and Disease Prevention Division at 410-396-4436.

11 TV Hill videos below: What is Monkey Pox? How does it spread?

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