A smart necklace monitors a person’s health through SWEAT

SWEAT, a smart bracelet that tracks human health, could change how 400 million people with diabetes around the world manage their glucose levels

  • The smart necklace is designed with a sensor that sits on the back of the neck
  • This allows small samples of sweat to be collected from the wearer
  • The sensor then checks serotonin and glucose levels
  • This may eliminate the need for a blood test for diabetics

A new smart bracelet that can measure multiple chemicals and concentrations in the wearer’s skin could change the lives of some 400 million diabetics worldwide, eliminating the need for fingerstick blood tests.

On the back of the device is a hook and pendant with a biochemical sensor that monitors glucose and serotonin levels when worn around the neck.

Engineers at Ohio State University have demonstrated that a smart bracelet can measure the concentration of sodium, potassium and hydrogen ions in a subject’s skin with up to 98.9 percent accuracy during human trials.

The team also envisions their biosensors being attached to personal items such as rings and earrings or implanted under the skin to alert users to changes in their health.

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On the back of the device is a hook and pendant with a biochemical sensor that monitors glucose and serotonin levels when worn around the neck.

Pictured is a graphic showing the placement of the smart necklace.  The perspiring biosensor is placed on the back of the neck.  The sensor is so powerful that it only needs a small amount of sweat to produce a reading

Pictured is a graphic showing the placement of the smart necklace. The perspiring biosensor is placed on the back of the neck. The sensor is so powerful that it only needs a small amount of sweat to produce a reading

Jinghua Li, one of the authors of the study, explained that there are hundreds of biomarkers in sweat that contain details of our health.

“Next-generation biosensors are so bio-intuitive and non-invasive that we can detect basic information contained in human body fluids,” he said in a statement.

I’ve also read that due to the small size of the sensor, it only takes a little sweat to capture a reading.

Lee and his team conducted the first human trials of a smart bracelet that was attached to a subject during a 30-minute bike ride.

The participant then took a 15-minute break, drank a sugary drink, and resumed cycling.

The results show that in all cases, the concentration of glucose in sweat reaches its maximum within 30-40 minutes after taking sugar.

“The results show a subtle rise in glucose concentration afterward, suggesting that sugar consumption may increase the amount of glucose in sweat,” the team shared in a study published in the journal Science Advances.

I read that while it will be some time before a device similar to this research prototype is available to the public, the team is thinking about how this potentially life-saving technology will benefit the people who need it most.

The first human tests of the smart necklace were placed on an object while they were cycling for 30 minutes.

The first human tests of the smart necklace were placed on an object while they were cycling for 30 minutes.

The results of human trials show that in all cases, the concentration of glucose in sweat reaches its maximum within 30-40 minutes after taking sugar.

The results of human trials show that in all cases, the concentration of glucose in sweat reaches its maximum within 30-40 minutes after taking sugar.

Instead of using the large and rigid computer chips found in our phones and laptops, the sensors are made of ultra-thin materials. This style of design makes the product highly flexible, protects the device’s functionality and ensures that it is securely in contact with the human skin.

While the research notes that further miniaturization could make this and similar devices possible to implant, Lee said he envisions it as a lightweight device with simple circuitry that can be easily integrated into our daily lives.

While this biosensor is designed to monitor health, a standalone wearable announced last year detects when a person is burned.

Developed by engineers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) and startup Xsensio, the technology detects levels of the stress hormone cortisol in sweat.

The device is placed directly on the wearer’s skin and offers high sensitivity and very low detection limits, the researchers said.

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