A bat on the beach tested positive for rabies

A bat on the beach tested positive for rabies

The Monterey County Health Department said Friday that a bat found on the beach has tested positive for the rabies virus. The bat was found on July 27 near East LaSalle Avenue. According to officials, as a result of the investigation, the infected bat did not touch anyone, but was a pet. According to health officials, the pet has been quarantined. Rabies can be transmitted to humans and pets through the bite or scratch of a rabid animal. The virus affects the central nervous system. It can cause pain in the brain that can eventually lead to death if a person is not properly cared for after potential exposure, officials said. Do not leave pets unattended, especially at dawn and dusk when wildlife is most active. Owners of domestic animals such as horses, sheep, goats, pigs and cattle should discuss rabies with their veterinarian, as these species are also susceptible to rabies infection. From rabid wild animals. Residents should not leave pet food and water outside as it encourages wildlife activity around the home. People should avoid constant contact with wild animals, especially skunks and bats. Do not touch or approach animals that are acting strangely. If any wildlife is found dead, abnormal or sick, or if you or your pets suspect rabies, call (831) 769-8850 or your local animal control agency. More information about rabies is available by calling the Monterey County Health Department’s Infectious Diseases Division at 831-755-4521 or by visiting the Animal Services website (www.hitchcockroadanimals.org) or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

The Monterey County Health Department announced Friday that a bat found on the beach has tested positive for the rabies virus.

The bat was found on July 27 near East LaSalle Avenue.

Officials said the investigation identified people who came into contact with an infected bat, but it was a pet. According to health officials, the pet was quarantined.

Rabies can be transmitted to humans and pets when bitten or scratched by a rabid animal.

The virus affects the central nervous system. It can cause pain in the brain, potentially leading to death if a person does not receive proper treatment after exposure, officials said.

In addition to currently vaccinating pets, the health department also recommends the following precautions:

  • Owners should not leave pets unattended, especially at dawn and dusk when wildlife can be active.
  • Owners of domestic animal species such as horses, sheep, goats, pigs, and cattle should discuss rabies vaccination with their veterinarian, as these species are more susceptible to rabies infection than rabid wild animals.
  • Residents should not leave pet food and water outside as this encourages wildlife activity around the home.
  • People should always avoid contact with wild animals, especially skunks and bats. Do not touch or approach animals that are acting strangely. If any wildlife is found dead, abnormal or sick, or if you or your pets suspect rabies, call (831) 769-8850 or your local animal control agency.
  • More information about rabies is available by calling the Monterey County Health Department’s Infectious Disease Division at 831-755-4521 or visiting the Animal Services website (www.hitchcockroadanimals.org) or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

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