6 possible cases of mysterious form of hepatitis in children with CHD

Six possible cases of mysterious hepatitis in children in Kentucky are being investigated



the governor. Good evening everyone. So we get the first slide, please, James. We will talk about hepatitis in children. Thus, the CDC is working with state health departments to identify children with hepatitis for unknown reasons. Some causes of hepatitis and children remain unknown. It is unknown whether the total number of children with hepatitis has increased. Late last year, however, there were reports of hepatitis and childhood abnormalities in Europe, as well as in the United Kingdom. We have now received a report of this inflammation of the liver through the World Health Organization. In 20 countries, at least in the United States, about 274 cases have been reported to date from 39 other states. In Kentucky, we currently have six cases under investigation. Children in Kentucky range in age from eight months to four years. It is important to note. It is most common in young children. The current definition for children affected is children under 10 years of age. Unfortunately, sometimes children need a liver transplant because the disease is so severe, but fortunately in Kentucky, none of these people, nor any of these six children, needed a transplant. Now, as I said, the reason is unknown. They ruled out common causes of hepatitis. Thus, hepatitis *** E or *** has different viral hepatitis infections. They also found no association with autoimmune hepatitis or the Covid 19 virus. Both on the link. It has nothing to do with the COVID-19 vaccine, which is important for humans. And many of these children are related to 41 types of adenovirus, which are not yet old enough to receive the *** Covid vaccine. Adenoviruses are now really common. This is an effective common cold for everyone. It is not known whether these viruses cause inflammation of the liver and healthy children. And all the children with this inflammation, which is still unknown, were previously healthy children. Adenovirus usually causes mild symptoms such as runny nose, cough, fever, sore throat, and possibly mild GI disease, dizziness, vomiting, or diarrhea. Therefore, it is not specific to a particular infection. Turn to James as we move on to the next slide. So, for the community, what do you need to know? First of all, this is not something that will cause you panic or excessive anxiety. But this is something you need to be careful of. So, if your child shows any of these signs or symptoms, you should seek medical advice from your pediatrician in a timely manner. Thus, the most common symptoms that indicate this are jaundice or jaundice of the skin. Unfortunately, vomiting and diarrhea are common, but because of the severity of the condition, children with this condition may experience some vomiting and diarrhea, yellowing of the eyes, and worsening of the skin. Uh, in the patients we tested in Kentucky. This association with adenovirus was found in only two of the six viruses. And I know that if your child gets sick, it’s dangerous to go to the hospital and see a doctor. You have questions. I want to give you some information about this process. First, tests for these viruses can help you understand the effects on public health and what you can do through public health to keep you safe. There is no specific treatment for adenovirus, such as antibiotics or antivirals. If your child is sick enough to require medical attention, they may need to be hospitalized for intravenous fluids and other support. Or they may be enough to visit the office more often in partnership with your pediatrician. Hmmm, but understand that. This is not something that can be rushed out and *** tested. This is something that the pediatrician should evaluate your child and give you an individual medical opinion on what to do. So we’re working with clinics across the state, and we’ve got information. Clinics can report to the Kentucky Department of Public Health at any time, and we ask that you report any circumstances that we believe fit the definition of this case, and we will work with you to facilitate all necessary testing and access to other information we have. it will help you in treating patients. So people, Covid hit us hard, but I think it reminds me of the formula for hepatitis, peanut butter babies, I think it’s the importance of public health and what we do. A wide range of things we rely on for public health in the state. And I want you to calm down and know that there is a wide network of 100 to 20 counties working on your behalf, and I am very grateful to the governor for supporting the important work we are doing. Thank you.

Six possible cases of mysterious hepatitis in children in Kentucky are being investigated

There are six possible cases of mysterious hepatitis in children in Kentucky, the health department confirmed on Thursday. Reports of unusual cases of hepatitis in Europe began late last year. This has now been observed in at least 20 countries and 274 cases in 39 states, the doctor said. Stephen Steck said Kentucky is investigating six cases involving children between the ages of 8 months and 4 years. He explained that the cause was unknown, but that health officials had ruled out common causes of hepatitis. Although Stack doesn’t think there’s any cause for panic, he said it’s important to know his symptoms: yellow skin and eyes, vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal blood labs. According to Stack, they were able to link the two cases to adenovirus, a very common virus, such as the flu or the common cold. Children with symptoms should be examined immediately by a pediatrician. Stack said there is no special treatment. Some children had to have a liver transplant, but Steck said that was not the case for children in Kentucky.

The Kentucky Department of Health confirmed Thursday that there are six cases of the mysterious form of hepatitis in children.

Reports of unusual cases of liver inflammation began in Europe late last year. This has now been observed in at least 20 countries and 274 cases in 39 states, the doctor said. Stephen Steck said.

Kentucky is investigating six cases involving children between the ages of 8 months and 4 years.

He explained that the cause was unknown, but that health officials had ruled out common causes of hepatitis.

Although Stack doesn’t think there’s any cause for panic, he said it’s important to know his symptoms: yellow skin and eyes, vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal blood labs.

According to Stack, they were able to link the two cases to adenovirus, a very common virus, such as the flu or the common cold.

Children with symptoms should be examined immediately by a pediatrician.

Stack said there is no special treatment.

Some children had to have a liver transplant, but Steck said that was not the case for children in Kentucky.

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