2 Mass. Cases of pediatric hepatitis are being investigated, says DPH

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health is investigating two cases of pediatric hepatitis in the state, but both were tested negative for adenovirus infection. The DPH said it would not provide additional information to respect the privacy of pediatric patients. Last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was investigating more than 100 cases of severe and undiagnosed hepatitis in children. He asked doctors and public health officials to report any such cases to minors. Elevated 10 liver enzymes and no clear explanation for the onset of hepatitis by October. Most children experience fatigue, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, dark urine, light-colored stools, and yellowing of their skin and eyes. More than half of all diseases worldwide are associated with the common virus adenovirus, which causes various diseases. However, some versions can cause other problems, including inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Officials are usually looking for a link to a specific version associated with intestinal inflammation. “As clinicians, we need to be careful with our children with the same symptoms,” the doctor said. Brian Chow, Tufts Medical Center staffer. “In the past, most of these cases in this epidemic were caused by a virus called adenovirus,” Chow said. “More than 90% of those children had to be hospitalized,” the doctor said. Ali Raja, deputy chairman of the emergency department at Massachusetts General Hospital, said last week. “In fact, 14% of them required a liver transplant. So that’s a big deal.” Raja said the injured children were young. “They were generally between 1 and 6 years old,” Raja said. “What parents need to pay attention to in the first place is that it is already very rare,” the doctor said. Richard Mallie told the Boston Children’s Hospital

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health is investigating two cases of pediatric hepatitis in the state, but both have been tested negative for adenovirus infection.

DPH said no additional information would be provided to respect the confidentiality of pediatric patients.

Last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was investigating more than 100 cases of severe and unexplained hepatitis in children.

He asked doctors and public health officials to notify the agency if children under the age of 10 had elevated liver enzymes and no clear explanation for their hepatitis by October.

Most of the children were healthy, with symptoms such as fatigue, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, dark urine, light-colored stools, and jaundice of the skin and eyes.

Worldwide, more than half of all illnesses are caused by the adenovirus, which causes various illnesses.

There are dozens of adenoviruses, many of which are associated with cold-like symptoms, fever, sore throat and pink eyes. However, some versions can cause other problems, including inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Officials are usually looking for a link to a specific version associated with intestinal inflammation.

“As clinicians, we need to be careful of our children who have similar symptoms,” the doctor said. This was reported by Brian Chow Tufts Medical Center.

“In the past, most of these cases in this epidemic were caused by a virus called adenovirus,” Chow said.

“More than 90% of these children had to be hospitalized,” the doctor said. Ali Raja, deputy chairman of the emergency department at Massachusetts General Hospital, said last week. “In fact, 14% of them required a liver transplant. So that’s a big deal.”

Raja said the injured children were young.

“They were usually between 1 and 6 years old,” Raja said.

“What parents need to pay attention to is, first and foremost, that this is already very rare,” the doctor said. Richard Mallie told the Boston Children’s Hospital

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